Thursday, 27 April 2017

LMS York Pilgrimage

I`m looking forward to being celebrant of this Mass again after a few years. H/T to Fr Henry for the posting.

Monday, 24 April 2017

Easter Octave

I may be not seeing the obvious but why is it that the Easter Octave in the Extraordinary Form ends on Easter Saturday not Low Sunday? I`ve looked at the Catholic Encyclopedia but not found an answer.

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Easter Sunday Music

I know some people like to know in advance so here is the music for Easter Sunday Mass at 12noon  at St Joseph`s. Many thanks to the Westland Singers

'By the first bright Easter day'...( 1889 Tune, words by Fr.Faber)Sung before Mass
Vidi Aquam...Ludwig Ebner.
Missa Martyrum...Bonfitto
Vitimae paschali laudes... Plainsong.
'Laudamus te'...(from the Gloria by Vivaldi).
O Filii et Filiae... Trad french tune.
Easter Hymn. Jesus Christ is ris'n today...(Tune 1708).

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Deanery Chat

Maybe lay people wonder what priests talk about at deanery meetings.
From this month`s deanery meeting:
The fathers discussed what is wrong with the diocese/universal Church.
`We have forgotten Vatican II and especially the spirit of Vatican II`
Me: I thought the SSPX have been told that Vatican II is optional and not following it doesn`t prevent you being a Catholic.
Disgruntled Father: Without Vatican II we`d be in a terrible state.
Me: How would that terrible state differ from what we have now?
No reply.

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

North East Catholic HIstory Society

I`ve been meaning to advertise these talks in advance. Tomorrow we have Hugh Shankland giving the following talk:Out of Italy-The Italians in the North East.. Hugh`s book is available on Amazon and I feel certain copies will be available at the talk.There is a synopsis of the book:

Out of Italy concerns the Italian contribution to life in North-East England since Roman times, with particular attention to the last 250 years. Italian-Swiss stuccoists decorated many of the region's finest historic buildings; a colony of skilled craftsmen from Como specialised in manufacturing optical instruments in Victorian Newcastle; and there have lived among us gifted Italian architects, artists, glass-blowers, mosaic workers, and even, briefly, Giuseppe Garibaldi. In the nineteenth century, numerous Italians from a peasant background found their way here to try their luck as street traders and organ-grinders, chestnut sellers and ice cream makers, and many went on to found their families' fortunes. But with the Second World War, when anti-Italian feeling ran high, the community's resilience was tested to the utmost: even elderly long-settled Italians were interned as 'enemy aliens', while other family members served in the British forces, one even winning the VC. From 1942, thousands of Italian prisoners-of-war filled labour camps in the North-East, and a few eventually settled. Mass emigration from Italy resumed after the war, bringing hundreds of men and women to work among us. Their presence and their skills, like those of their many forerunners, have coloured the life of our region in numerous ways. Over 300 evocative illustrations accompany a lively narrative which details the lives of many individuals and families within the broader context of their times. This is the first book to study Italian immigration in a region of England in such detail and over such a long period of time

We`ve had a number of talks about the Irish in the North East so this will be a new perspective. Maybe one day we`ll get a talk on the Polish community in the North East.

The talk will be held in the meeting room at St Andrew`s church, Worswick St, Newcastle starting at 2.15pm. All welcome. Non-members of the society are asked for a donation of £1.