Wednesday, 25 June 2014

Could it happen here?



Priestly Fraternity of St Peter to begin new apostolates this autumn


The FSSP is to expand in major cities: in Texas (El Paso), and in several other important locations in North America and Europe, to be announced later this summer.

Founded less than 26 years ago, the FSSP numbers 407 with average age 37 (including 244 priests and 163 seminarians); plus over 4,000 members in their sodality, the Confraternity of St Peter (a worldwide prayer network for vocations, open to all). Their status is similar to the Oratorians, half way between secular and religious. At the invitation of local bishops – including Cardinals and Archbishops of major cities – FSSP priests serve local communities of faithful attached to the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, in 122 dioceses across Europe, Africa, America and Oceania. Since the year 2000, they have ordained 12 priests per year on the average. In England, they have so far one house with two priests, serving two dioceses (Portsmouth and Northampton). But with several English priests serving abroad, and 9 seminarians from England in formation (plus two applicants just admitted), they could be invited to help in more dioceses across England, especially where fewer local clergy leads to closing down churches. On their Silver Jubilee last October, Pope Francis “exhorted them, according to their own charisma, to take an active part in the mission of the Church in the world of today, through the testimony of a holy life, a firm faith and an inventive and generous charity”.

12 comments:

  1. Please God, I hope one day they will be invited to Wales!

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    1. and Florida too!

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    2. They are already in Florida. Check their northamerican website with more info on locations and masd schedule

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  2. Time for all of us to get down on our knees and PRAY, PRAY, PRAY.

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    1. PRAY WITHOUT
      CEASING

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  3. We need them in the Diocese of Hexham & Newcastle where churches have already been closed & others are under threat. How can we expect to re-call our missing Catholics if we don't have churches for them? I do realise that we almost have a 'chicken & egg' situation here but let us be ready to welcome our fellow Catholics back

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  4. This may be another case of: If you want to see how things will be in England in 20 year's time, look at America today.

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  5. Forward looking bishops will invite them Bishops stuck in a 70's warp won't. I hope he is reading this!

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  6. I have had the great privilege of being invited twice to the FSSP seminary in the USA (Denton, Nebraska). I have also stayed at its seminary at Wigratzad in Germany and the seminary of the Institute of Christ the King at Gricigliano in Florence. The vibrancy, energy, and truly Catholic ethos of these seminaries was a joy to behold. These seminaries are full to bursting and it is a tragedy that they cannot take all the young men who apply. It is also a tragedy for the faithful of this country that our young men are having to travel abroad to study and when they are ordained are being spurned by many of our own bishops who will not welcome them back to serve their people here. It is more than a tragedy it is a scandal.

    Compare the dramatic growth of these 'traditional' (i.e. Catholic) seminaries to the sad state of affairs at our own seminary of Ushaw College which died a slow death over a period of more than 40 years when the number of applicants dwindled to a trickle because no young men wanted to go there. It is also telling that the most vociferous critics of Ushaw College come from the ranks of priests who had studied there.

    Too many heads have been stuck in the sand and nothing will improve until those in authority accept that the path which has been trodden in this country - and others - has proved to be disastrous. The irony of the situation is that the training being given at these 'traditional' (i.e. 'Catholic') seminaries is much more attuned to the wishes of the Fathers of Vatican II and Saint Pope John XXIII than anything that has been offered in this country since the mid to late 1960s.

    Pope Francis may well exhort these priests in the FSSP to take an active part in the mission of the Church in the world of today but this is their most ardent desire. Our Holy Father should also address these words to many of our bishops who are denying these priests the opportunities to take an active part, and are denying the faithful the spiritual benefits of their ministry. I would urge any bishop, or priest, who will not welcome these fine priests into their dioceses to read the Second Vatican Council's document on the sacred liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium, just to remind themselves what the Fathers of the Council actually decreed and then they might just change their minds about a great many things.

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  7. Leo, as usual, has summed up the situation very neatly.

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  8. I am told that the UK has been split between the FSSP (taking the south) & the ICKSP (taking the north). I have already written to Canon Montjean suggesting they look at Hexham & Newcastle & they have promised to do so. My only concern is how would this sit with the local clergy already committed to the EF. Perhaps some might comment!

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